Tech Guide

Watercooling

Watercooling for the PC has been around for years in some form or another,  with basic physics defining why you'd want to use it. That means for air cooling, to cope with increasing temperature in the heatsink you need to move the air across it faster. That's why thermostatically controlled fans in your PC will turn faster the hotter something gets. The increased rotational speed of a fan, depending on the heatsink it's moving air from, produces more noise...

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PCIe 4.0

A number of components within a modern PC use a high-speed interface to communicate with one another. Known as PCI Express, or PCIe (Peripheral Component Interconnect Express), it is the conduit that links the motherboard to devices such as graphics cards, solid-state drives (SSDs), regular hard drives, Ethernet cards, and high-speed WiFi. Governed by the PCI Special Interest Group (PCI-SIG), the interconnect's speed is defined by its version and number of lanes that are grouped together to form the physical...

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Chassis Airflow

Overview This TekSpek explains why good case airflow is essential for a reliable, modern PC system. The Technology The modern PC is potentially a mass of heat output and heat production hot spots. With CPUs rated at more than 100W of heat output, single graphics boards carrying similar ratings (and people want to run two!), multiple hard drives the norm, lots of memory and mainboards covered in heatpipes to combat toasty core logic and PWM circuits, a PC appreciably warming up a...

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Computer Cases

Today's PC cases come in all shapes and sizes, and the search for the perfect chassis often starts with the same question: what size do I need? Generally speaking, PC cases are available in two primary form factors; desktop and tower. The former, designed as its name suggests to sit horizontally on top of a desk, is ideal in scenarios where space is limited - these cases can often sit tidily beneath a monitor, and they're equally adept at slotting...

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HDMI

What is HDMI? HDMI stands for High-Definition Multimedia Interface, and it's an audio/video connector that's designed to be a digital successor to the multitude of analogue connectors already available - such as coaxial, composite, SCART and VGA to name but a few. The 19-pin connector measures approximately 14mm in width and 4.5mm in height. Despite its relatively-small proportions, it's capable of delivering up to 10.2Gbit/s of bandwidth. That's enough to transmit uncompressed video at QSXGA (2,560x2,048) resolutions - comfortably higher than...

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